The Books of January

StockSnap_Q9KNRI9EU2.jpgIn my senior year of university I had to take an entertainment writing class to round out my journalism degree.  My midterm involved writing a review of something (it might have been a book or a play or a movie, I can’t remember what exactly anymore), and long story short I got a D.  I pretty much failed at writing a review.  It was the only D I ever got, and it stung.  Luckily my final was writing a feature piece about an artist, and I excelled at that sort of thing, so I ended up passing the class with an A.  But.  This near-failure has stayed with me.

I will be turning 35 years old this year.  It’s constantly kind of a shock to me, since I still think of myself as between the ages of 18 and 22: at the very brink of a new life full of possibility, and every day discovering something new about myself.

The truth is though that I’m smack dab in the middle of my life – a wonderful life, if I do say so myself – and while I am still occasionally discovering new things about myself, mostly I am just recognizing my personal truths.  And one of my personal truths is this: I love to read, and I love to recommend books to others, but I don’t particularly love to write a monthly synopsis of ALL the books I’ve  read.  And I’m not particularly good at it.  Hence, my monthly reading wrap-ups have fallen by the wayside.

StockSnap_Y4P32I1G1K.jpgI’d like to return to writing a monthly list of what I read, for posterity’s sake, but I’m going to keep it simple this time.  Just a list of the book titles and authors.  If I really hate it I might make note of that, but otherwise I probably loved it, and you should probably read it too.

So, at long last, here are the books I read in January:

  1. A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms by George R. R. Martin
  2. The Real Minerva by Mary Sharratt
  3. Flight of the Sparrow by Amy Belding Brown
  4. Eliza Waite by Ashley E. Sweeney
  5. The Valley by Helen Bryan
  6. Doc by Mary Doria Russell
  7. Gold, Fame, Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins (great dystopian near-future read!)
  8. Leaving Lucy Pear by Anna Solomon

In case this just isn’t enough for you, I am planning an occasional book review series focusing on homesteading, farming and gardening books, and I will be doing a complete review of those (as well as offering some giveaways, so stay tuned!)  In the meantime, happy reading!

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